Category Archives: iPad App Reviews

If you’re a fan of iPad apps, you’ve landed in the right place. Here we cover many of the best apps and games in the iPad App Store, and even some that are not so great, just so you’lll know which to avoid. We cover all the iPad app categories – from iPad editions of newspapers and magazines, to productivity apps, games, eBook apps, utilities, social networking apps, photography apps, and more.

Quick Look: Bear for iPad

The screenshot above should also make it obvious, but if you were wondering if iOS has just received another really good-looking notes app that also sync with the Mac, then the answer is yes. Bear uses simple plain text for all of its formatting, so the notes you type out are easily transferrable — at any time — to any other platform or service. However, just because you’re using plain text, it doesn’t mean your notes have to look plain: Bear also handles rich text formatting with Markdown, and it displays pictures right alongside body text.

The Simple Bear Necessities

Whereas other plain text tools like iA Writer 4 focus more on being plain text writing machines, Bear feels like it focuses specifically on taking great notes in a flexible format. There are extra writing elements like word counts and read times in the right sidebar, but I’ve definitely become a bit of a snob when it comes to writing apps: without some sort of focus mode to keep text centered, I don’t consider Bear a full-fledged writing app for my purposes. That’s fine though, because in my brief testing period, it feels like a fantastic app for notes.

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Quick Look: Amaziograph for iPad

Amaziograph isn’t a pro-level app, but it’s one of those apps that really shines on the iPad Pro. Pick up an Apple Pencil, spend $2 on Amaziograph, and start to re-discover the fun of creating tessellations and mirrored images in just a fraction of the time it takes to create them manually.

The mechanics of Amaziograph are dead-simple to learn. You choose one of 10 initial grid types, each with different kinds of mirror or tiling effects. Then you just start drawing and watch as your strokes are multiplied across your screen. This is one of those apps where the act of creation is really part of the experience. There’s a genuinely soothing effect to seeing how your drawing can come to life as you add a little line here, a circle there, and finish things off with a blast of colour. It can feel like you’re drawing with 10 of your greatest clones, and they’re all perfectly in sync with you.

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Quick Look: Screens 4.2 for iPad

It’s been a while since I talked about Screens, the VNC app that helps me remotely control my Mac from my iOS devices.Screens 4.2 came out this past week and introduced an interesting set of in-app purchases.

You can now use a Dark Mode for a very reasonable $0.99, and for $2.99, you can enable an accompanying iOS device to act as a trackpad for your remote connection. I have no need for a dark mode in Screens because I spend most of my time controlling my Mac from the iPad, so I barely ever see the Screens UI. However, the idea of the trackpad was interesting, so I cleared some space on my desk this evening to try the iPad and iPhone side by side.

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A Second Round with OneNote for iPad

I’ve given OneNote another shot over the past few months, using it both at work and at home for tracking receipts and personal thoughts. I’ve written about OneNote before, but I don’t think I really gave it a fair shake, so I moved 2000 notes over to the service to really determine whether or not I could adapt to the service. Unfortunately, the answer is still no, but I have a more detailed idea of why.

In OneNote We Trust

OneNote has been around for years, but it was only in the past few that it became a free product. You don’t have to pay for any monthly plans because the app just uses space in your Microsoft OneDrive, and there’s more than enough space with a free OneDrive account that it’s indistinguishable from unlimited for most users. Microsoft is so large, and OneNote such a core product, that I really do feel like I can trust in the service to stick around for the foreseeable future. That factor is a big deal when thinking about which note app to invest in: with platforms coming and going, where will your cache of notes still be accessible in four or five years? With OneNote, Microsoft has built up enough trust with me that the answer feels like a pretty safe “Yes”.

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Popular Email Client Cloud Magic is now Newton, and it’s Packed with Power Features

Newton Email

One of my favorite email clients, Cloud Magic is now Newton.  Cloud Magic was already a clean, fast reliable way to navigate and triage your email.  With a reliable push notification system, and versions for both iOS and Mac, Newton had developed into a mature ecosystem.  Now that they have built their app into a huge success, the creators of Newton felt that it was time for the next stage of development.  They intend to take this awesome email client/platform, and add even more power features and improvements.  Furthermore, they plan to add support for additional platforms and evolve Newton into a email client that boosts your productivity by making email fun and easy.

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Publishing to WordPress with Ulysses 2.6

Publishing on iOS has never been a terribly smooth process for me. The closest I got was the Blogsy app, which had a WYSYWIG editor and support for multiple blogs. Unfortunately it had an interface made for iOS 6 and just couldn’t afford to keep up with subsequent iOS updates.

The next best thing has been the official WordPress app, which can handle the three self-hosted WordPress sites that I post to. I write in Markdown in another app like iA Writer or Ulysses, and then post the draft as HTML into the WordPress app, and then add extras like categories, tags, and pictures. It doesn’t take very long, and it mimics what I’d do on the desktop, but the WordPress app feels pretty uninspired to me. It works, but lacks the polish of the web app. It’s not fun to use.

My latest workflow has been using Ulysses 2.6 and its new publishing features, which can take my Markdown-formatted post, and then add images, categories, tags, and even featured images and excerpts. All before I ever even see the WordPress interface.

This doesn’t sound like a huge deal but for the fact that Ulysses doesn’t seem like a full-fledged online writing app. I expect it to handle text well, but I’m surprised at how smooth they’ve managed to make the publishing and previewing processes.

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The (3) Best Fantasy Football Draft Guide Apps for your iPad

FANTASY-FOOTBALL-IPAD

The NFL regular season is right around the corner.  Autumn is in the air (well not here in Florida, but you know what I mean) and that means football!  No, I’m not talking about soccer either–I mean FOOTBALL!  The only sport that really matters until February.  With Football season comes Fantasy Football, and with Fantasy Football comes Draft parties.  So grab a bunch of your friends, throw some over-sized meat on the grill, pop open an adult beverage of your choice, and get ready to take over the world.  Hopefully, you’ve already been evaluating the newest rookie prospects, and deciding which players are highest on your depth charts.  However, if you need a little help cheating preparing for you draft so you can dominate your friends once again, these are the (3) best apps for doing just that, in no particular order.

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My Main Concern With Apple Notes: No Good Export

Feeling Trapped with Apple Notes_1

The last time I wrote about Apple Notes was in early July. I wrote that post to try and balance out all of the very strongly-worded posts about dumping Evernote and jumping to Apple Notes, the newest free note-taking solution that synced across all Apple devices.

I can see why most people don’t want to have to pay for a Notes solution, so moving from Evernote to Apple Notes seems like a very easy switch. However, I was wary of fully committing to Apple’s service because there doesn’t seem to be any easy way of getting your data out of the service in a meaningful way. You can get plain text notes to export from Apple Notes…but that’s about it. All the pictures, rich URLs, media, and any files you’ve attached to your notes…those can’t be exported en masse or imported into any other service at this time.

Despite all of that, I decided to give Apple Notes another solid try for the past month and a half.

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Ulysses 2.6 for iPad

I can’t believe they’re calling Ulysses 2.6 a dot update. Adding WordPress publishing, Dropbox sync, and universal search feel like much more than that. And, they even had the nerve to add Typewriter scrolling, which was my #1 feature request ever since Ulysses made it to the iPad. Am I happy with this Ulysses update? No. I’m ecstatic.

Here, let’s talk about why.

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Quick Look: Mountie Monitor Extender

MBP-iPad-Mountie

Tell me if this sounds familiar to you–you’re working on your laptop and you wish you had just a little more real-estate on your screen.  Having another window open can go a long way unmaking you more productive.  Maybe it’s your email–maybe you are a heavy Twitter user, and you like to keep the app open and active, or perhaps you want the extra screen for a  FaceTime or Skype call.  Whatever the reason, there aren’t too many functional and affordable options out there to choose from.

While searching for options, I came accross the Mountie from the folks at Ten 1 design.  Not only was it pretty much exactly what I was looking for, but the minimalistic design and affordable price tag were icing on the cake.  Available in both green and blue, the Mountie offers a convenient and easy way to add an additional monitor to your MacBook or PC without adding unwanted bulk to your set-up.

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Lightroom 2.4 for iPad: RAW Editing, Keyboard Shortcuts, and More!

 

Lightroom 2.4 for iOS came out last week, and I’ve been using it quite a lot over the past few days. The big breakout features are RAW edits and local adjustments, so let’s dive right into those.

RAW!!!

RAW files are big and harder to process than JPEGs, but they provide a lot more room to edit colours, highlights, and shadows. Until this update, there really hasn’t been any elegant way to manage and edit them on the iPad. So the simple fact that Lightroom can now handle RAW files — on iOS 9 no less — is awesome. I would have really enjoyed having this capability during my Japan trip (although it probably would have meant staying up later processing photos).

My 128 GB iPad still lacks the storage space to keep everything on board, but it definitely has enough room to download my shots after a few days of shooting. This matches the way I approch RAWs very well, since I tend to keep just the JPEGs, and only bring a RAW file out when I’ve messed up exposure and need more leeway for editing.
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