App & Game Bundles Hit the App Store

iOS App Bundles

One of the nice new features of the App Store in iOS 8 is Bundles. Bundles are sets of multiple apps from the same developer, on offer to download together at special, discounted prices. If you already own any of the apps in a particular bundle, you can rest of the bundle for a reduced price.

There are app Bundles and game Bundles and this week there’s even a dedicated App Store collection highlighting them. You can find it in the Featured section of the App Store, right amongst the rotating featured items at the top.

The available bundles are already quite impressive looking – ranging from popular games to productivity packs and even bundles specifically for kids apps.

This new feature seems like a win-win for users and developers – helping make users aware of titles they might not have know from a favorite developer and developers entice users to take a look at more of their apps.

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Price Drops: Notes Plus for iPad 90% Off Today

Notes Plus for iPad

Notes Plus, one of the most popular and well respected iPad notes apps around, is on sale at 90% off today. It’s available for 99 cents today – down from its standard $9.99.

This is a versatile note taking app that will let you type or do handwriting recognition. Our own James Potter recently did a review of Notes Plus and was extremely impressed with it.

I love this bit of the app’s App Store introduction:

After more than 4 years of continuous development, 29 version upgrades, 3 complete overhauls, and 8 million downloads, we pride ourselves on being one of the most feature-rich and best quality note-taking apps on the App Store.

If you’re after a good notes app for the iPad at a bargain price, then you may well want to grab Notes Plus while it’s on sale today – at the Notes Plus App Store page.

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Hyperlapse from Instagram: The First iPad Camera App I’m Not Embarrassed To Use

Hyperlapse

I remember sending an article about Microsoft’s research on Hyper-lapse to a co-worker in early August and lamenting the fact that only Microsoft seemed to have access to the cool tech. Then, lo and behold, Instagram decided to release their own Hyperlapse app last week for both iPhone and iPad.

This feels like one of those rare instances where we get our hands on tech far earlier than anticipated, and I’m hoping that Hyperlapse continues to stay as open and easy to use as it does now. As Viticci of MacStories pointed out, you don’t need to log in to Hyperlapse to use it. You just load it up, take video, and then choose your preferred time lapse speed for playback. I haven’t bothered sharing any of my videos to Instagram or Twitter yet, but rather have been saving them locally for a review I’m working on. My time-lapsed videos from Hyperlapse are much smoother than the time lapse I’ve used in other apps, and the built-in time lapse feature has saved me a good hour of equivalent editing in Final Cut Pro.

Hyperlapse is also one of the rare camera apps I’d recommend using on the iPad. Set an iPad up by the window of your apartment or house, tilt it up towards the sky or down at the street, and just hit record. It doesn’t feel goofy to try, and the resulting video can look truly magical.

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Office for iPad Now Offers Monthly Subscriptions Via In-App Purchase

Office for iPad Monthly Subscription

Some good news today for anyone who wants to use Microsoft Office on the iPad: Microsoft are now offering monthly subscriptions to Office 365, directly within the Office for iPad apps via In-App purchase.

So instead of just one option to buy a year’s subscription to Office 365 at $99.99 in order to use the apps, now you can opt for a monthly subscription plan starting at $6.99 per month.

The two Office 365 subscription plans you can choose from are Office 365 Personal at $6.99 per month and Office 365 Home at $9.99 per month. The Personal plan allows for Office 365 use on one Mac or PC and one tablet device; while the Home plan allows for 5 PCs or Macs and 5 tablets.

Here’s a little excerpt from the Office Blogs post on these new subscription plans:

As we continue to bring Microsoft Office to all platforms and devices, it’s important for customers to manage their Office 365 subscription—easily and on the go. You asked for more flexibility in signing up for Office 365 subscriptions on iPad. So starting today, you can buy a monthly subscription to Office 365 from within Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for iPad. You can choose between Office 365 Personal and Office 365 Home. Office 365 Personal is designed to help individuals who want to use Office on one PC or Mac and one tablet, while Office 365 Home is for households with up to five PCs or Macs, plus five tablets.

It took Microsoft an awfully long time to bring Office to the iPad; it’ good to see them now making it a little easier to pay for a required subscription for it – even though opting for the monthly plan adds up to a bigger total cost for the year.

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Trying Out Byword For My iPad Blogging

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I recently bought the In-app purchase within Byword to try and blog straight from the app. Up until now, my workflow has been to write in Byword or Writer Pro, copy the html into the WordPress app, and then add screenshots processed by the Screenshot app before publishing.

Byword’s most recent update claims it can cut out one of the middle men by allowing me to publish to WordPress and add pictures straight from the app. I tried it out quickly today with this post and am quite impressed with how simple and easy it turned out to be. It’s definitely buggy on the iOS 8 beta, but this seems like a great workable solution for blogging from the iPad, without feeling like I’m using all sorts of workarounds.

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Evernote As My iPad Task Manager

I use Evernote quite a lot for my own notes, but I also use it at work. I’ve got two notebooks for each of the positions I’ve held at work, and I’ve got a few tags associated with notes depending on which coworkers I need to consult for a given project. However, as of three […]

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