Essential Education Apps for iPad: A High Schooler’s Take

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Every so often there’s a revolution in education. The iPad and the boundless possibilities it brings with it are one of those revolutions.

Whether you’re an iPad aficionado or simply a recreational user, the iPad has the power to make your life easier. Regardless of age or specialization, these are the apps every student should have.

iWork Suite – Not one app, but a set of three: Pages, Numbers, and Keynote. Until Microsoft releases office for the iPad, these are your best options for a word processor, number cruncher, and presentation creator. They’re made by Apple, so you know they will work great, and they offer the option to export in Windows compatible formats.

Khan Academy – This is a must have for any high school student. The library of content covers math, science topics such as biology, chemistry, and physics, and even reaches into the humanities with playlists on finance and history. It doesn’t quite reach into the college levels but it can act as a good refresher if you forget anything over the years. With 4,200 videos and growing, Khan Academy is only going to get better.

Google Translate – If you’re studying a language, Google Translate is a must have. Don’t trust it for complex sentences or paragraphs, as it doesn’t understand grammar, but for looking up a word here and there nothing beats it. It can also detect what the input language is, which can be a nice feature to have at times.

Dropbox or Google Drive – These apps allow you to store documents and such in the cloud and access the content from different devices. It’s impossible to pick only one of these apps as the best.  It depends on what your peers and school use, and whether or not you want Google looking through all your personal documents. Seriously, though, you can’t go wrong with either.

Quizlet or Brainscape – This is another question of compatibility. There are some schools who rely heavily on Quizlet, and if your school is one of them, by all means use it. If not, a less main stream but more feature rich option is Brainscape. They offer flash cards already made for your subject, or you can make your own. Read more about Brainscape here.

iBooks – There’s no better way to cut down on what you’re carrying around than iBooks. You can not only get just about every school required reading book on the iBooks store, but the number of textbooks offered is steadily growing as well. When reading your downloaded books, you can highlight and take notes right in the book – a bit different than having a school issued copy. You can also save PDF’s into the app so you can keep all of your reading material in the same place.

Safari or Chrome – Why not just recommend Safari and be done with it? In its most elementary form, because of the question of cross compatibility. iCloud tabs are great when transitioning directly from working on your iPad to working on your Mac, but Safari most certainly isn’t the best option for a Windows browser. Chrome offers a feature where you can move between devices much like iCloud tabs, so if you’re a Windows user this might be a better option for you. They also offer Chrome for the Mac if you so desire, but choose whichever will suit you best and will work for your needs.

Another thing to keep in mind is the “Popular Near Me” feature in the App Store. Check what it says is most downloaded the next time you are at school or work. It will give you a good idea of what those around you are using and could provide some good suggestions specific to your situation.

Agree or disagree with these essential apps, or have one you can’t live without? Talk to me on Google+ and get involved in the conversation, or leave a comment below!

Henry T

I'm a high school student who loves everything Apple, especially my iPad. When not studying or working out, I can be found dabbling in music or killing it at volleyball... or writing amazing articles for iPadinsight.com. Talk to me on Google+, my username is Henry T.

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