Notable New iPad Apps: The Elements in Action

Share this:

The Elements in Action iPad app

The Elements in Action is not just a notable new iPad app – it’s also one of those ‘wow factor’ apps that make us remember what the iPad is all about. The sort of app that just feels like the iPad is The perfect home for.

It’s a science focused app and I’m a guy who never especially enjoyed or exceled at science, but it has gripped me from the moment I opened it. I don’t know my elements from my elbows, but I’ve now learned more about quite a few of them in just a short time with the app than I ever took in back in my school days.

Here’s a bit of the App Store description for the app:

The periodic table comes to life with 79 video explorations of the weird, wonderful, and sometimes alarming properties of the elements. Filmed by BAFTA award winner Max Whitby in partnership with Theodore Gray, author of the iconic book and app The Elements, and previously available only in a few museum installations, this is the most beautifully filmed collection videos ever assembled to explore and explain what makes each element unique and fascinating.


What happens when highly reactive rubidium is dropped into water? Or when a cannonball is placed in a pool of mercury? The Elements in Action shows you one definitive demonstration for (almost) every element, ranging from the bizarre to the sublime, all assembled in one place for you to view in the comfort and safety of your iPad, with very little danger of death by fire, dismemberment, or poisoning.

Terbium

The videos are extremely well done and fascinating to watch, and the accompanying text is concise and full of good information. I don’t remember any of the experiments in my classes looking anywhere near as cool as many of these.

Magnesium

Magnesium 2

As great as the app is on its own, it’s even better if you get the original app it’s now a companion to – The Elements: A Visual Exploration.

The Elements in Action works as a stand-alone app, but really shines when combined with the original app, The Elements: A Visual Exploration. Installed together, the two apps find each other and link together, allowing you to flip seamlessly between viewing the elements as objects of contemplation in the original, and objects of dynamic action in the second

I’ve got both apps installed now and can’t wait to spend time enjoying them with my 10 year old daughter. I have to imagine this might become a very popular iPad app in science classrooms.

Here’s an App Store link for The Elements in Action; it’s priced at $3.99.

The following two tabs change content below.

Patrick Jordan

Founder and Editor in Chief of iPad Insight. Husband, father to a lovely daughter, Commander of the Armies of the North, dog lover (especially Labs), Austinite, former Londoner, IT consultant, huge sports nut, iPad and mobile tech blogger, mobile apps junkie.

Comments are closed.