Tag Archives: Parental Controls

Tips and Tricks: Disable Explicit Content Playback on HomePod

One of the areas where Apple’s iOS has excelled since early days is in Parental Control options. While others have caught up and Amazon has even passed them when it comes to granular, on-device options, Apple is still at or near the top when it comes to restricting music streaming. In fact, several of their competitors have little to nothing in the way of content ratings restrictions for music.

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Apple’s Aging Parental Controls Called into Question, Apple Responds

As recently as four or five years ago, Apple’s parental controls were considered to be the industry standard for mobile devices. They give parents a lot of basic functionality, including the ability to disable apps and features, select allowed content ratings for music, video, podcasts, and apps, and do either basic web filtering or blacklist/whitelist website selections. However, while these settings work pretty well for use with younger children, they do lack a level of flexibility that work make them better as kids grow into teenagers.Apple also lacks any built-in monitoring mechanisms, currently.

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How to set-up and use Parental Controls on your iPhone

parental-controlsIf you have kids, you’ve probably handed them your iPhone a time or two to keep them occupied while out to dinner.  Perhaps you’ve introduced them to an educational game, or let them use your device for homework or to practice math skills like my youngest son does every week. The earlier you introduce them to technology, the faster they master it.  I know my kids are very tech savvy, more so then I ever was at their age.

However, along with this shared interest in technology, we as parents have a responsibility to keep them safe, and manage what apps they use, and the websites they visit on our devices. I’m _really_ tired of reading posts about parents claiming that Apple needs to refund them for purchases they didn’t authorize. If your young son or daughter uses your iPhone, especially if they know your passcode and Apple ID password, you should be held responsible for purchases made on that phone.

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