My New iPad Screen: Protected

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Ghost Armor Install

The first thing I did with my lovely new iPad, right after walking out the door of the Apple store with it, was get its spectacular new screen protected.

Luckily for me, there is a Ghost Armor kiosk just a few steps away from my local Apple store, so I shot straight over there after buying the new iPad. I’ve been using Ghost Armor to protect my iPad screens since back in 2010 and have written here before about how good both their product and service are.

Today my experience with them was even better than before, and that’s saying something – trust me. The young gentleman running the kiosk was there bright and early before the Apple store opened its doors, and he had good straight answers for us on our new iPad questions right away. Namely that the iPad 2 screen protectors would work fine on the new iPad, as the screen size has not changed, but the back cover protection will not work as the camera hole is larger and the dimensions are just a little different. They’ll have new back covers available within a few days I expect.

Apart from the great quality of the Ghost Armor screen protector itself, one of the main reasons I use their kiosk is that I am a complete clod when it comes to installing screen protectors myself. This morning mine was applied to the new iPad in around 10 minutes. I didn’t even have to go away and get a coffee. By the time I had a quick chat with the kiosk manager and paid up ($40 plus tax) my gorgeous new iPad screen was protected and ready to go.

The install is spot-on perfect, and just in case you’re wondering Yes the awesome new display looks just as awesome with the barely noticeable Ghost Armor screen protector on it – and now I know it’s safe from nicks and scratches and all that kinda bad stuff. :)

If you’re looking for a great screen protector for your new iPad, check out the Ghost Armor site to see if they have a location near you.

What are you all doing to protect the new iPad screen? Are you letting it go naked or using a protector of some kind?

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Patrick Jordan

Founder and Editor in Chief of iPad Insight. Husband, father to a lovely daughter, Commander of the Armies of the North, dog lover (especially Labs), Austinite, former Londoner, IT consultant, huge sports nut, iPad and mobile tech blogger, mobile apps junkie.

11 thoughts on “My New iPad Screen: Protected

  1. Isn’t the new iPad using Gorilla Glass? So what is $40 protecting you from short of a shatter?

    • As far as I’m aware, Gorilla Glass is said to be scratch resistant, not scratch proof. I’ve got a young daughter, a large dog, and a mischievous cat in my household. $40 for a little extra protection for a device I paid $900 for doesn’t seem excessive to me.

  2. We have 4 iPads in our household now, I’ve never felt the need to protect any of them. That goes for every version of iPhone I’ve had too. It’s party to do with the video of the very first iPhone I saw where it was put through all sorts of tests, including the guy taking a set of keys to the screen and it didn’t get marked. Also, the first screen protectors sucked and I’ve seen so many badly fitted with bubbles all over the place, it’s made me wonder why some people ruin their displays like that.
    I will concede screen protectors have improved and applied properly they can be barely noticeable, but I guess I’m at a point now where I believe you’ve got to go something to scratch a iOS device and I think if I’m clumsy enought to regret having a screen protector, chances are Im gonna need a new screen :-)

  3. I don’t want to make you feel bad about the protection on your new baby… but without ruining an upcoming review I have for iSource – I have a new love in screen protectors. SGP Glass-t.

    More to come on this…

  4. Gorilla class isn’t scratch proof, its only scratch resistant. And depending on the circumstances not very restant at that.

    I put my Galaxy Note face down on my desk like a moron… then I bumped it with my elbow and it slid about 4 inches. There was hairline scratches on a couple different places. My wife carried the iPhone 4s sound in her purse for a day… looked worse than my iPhone 4 did after a year of me carrying it.

  5. Why are people questioning why you got the cover? Ghost Armor is an advertiser of yours, right?

    • Really? That’s an insinuation I take very seriously. The fact is, Ghost Armor did run an ad or two on this site over a year ago. They ran that ad after I had written about their product and sung its praises. I did not provide them any extra coverage because they advertised, nor do I ever provide any coverage at all in return for ads or payment of any kind.

      Read our About page. Our stance on pay for coverage is very strong. There are many sites out there that not only accept, but demand payment for coverage and reviews. I am very proud to run a site that is dead set against that.

  6. I have a question: when reading reviews of screen protectors, one person said that a plastic screen protector would effectively turn a retina display back to a pre-retina display. I have a Zagg protector on my iphone, carefully followed the directions, an have orange peel all over. I keep it on because I plan to sell it soon and want it pristine. So does Ghost Armor reduce clarity at all?

  7. I had my iPad 3 ,armored,! Whilst in sawgrass mills in Florida, it is without doubt the best covering I have seen. There is no loss of clarity, and everybody who sees it is impressed
    Can I get the product in the United Kingdom yet or failing that can it be sent via the ghost armor website? And at what cost.

  8. Pingback: iPad mini Ghost Armored & A Lesson Learned | iPad Insight

  9. Why do people feel compelled to waste money on some silly screen protector? They serve absolutely no function, except to pad the wallets of the folks that sell them. Yes, years ago, they were very much needed, but today’s screen technology completely eliminates any benefits of using one, and, in fact, they cause more issues than they fix. Even Apple specifically recommends against them: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1324?viewlocale=en_US